• downbutnotout's Avatar

    downbutnotout shared a photo

    Wall_tell_people_what_they_mean_to_you

    Thank you to all my family and friends that have been there for me during my diagnosis and treatments. I love you all!

    2 Comments
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      So true. Inheard on the radio yesterday about a man in his 40s who hopped onto a plane to go to watch an out of state baseball game. He got sick on the flight. The plane made an emergency landing. The man was dead 20 minutes later. He wasn't sick. He was off to have a good time. No one guessed he would never come back home again. Life is precious and we never know when we will have to say good bye to friends and loved ones. Make every moment count.

      about 1 month ago
    • Gma's Avatar
      Gma

      I agree. I also heard this in a sermon on Mother's Day. I guess it was in reference to children honoring their parents. Anyway, the gist was to let those you love know it and if you were going to send flowers, do it now. The Pastor said this, "Dead noses smell no roses" and I thought "how true!"

      about 17 hours ago
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    downbutnotout asked a questionMultiple Myeloma

    A "Hospitalist", have you had one while in the hospital? Instead of your doctor making rounds and checking on you?

    19 answers
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      It just depends on how a hospital is set up.

      about 1 month ago
    • CentaurWill's Avatar
      CentaurWill

      1. I don't have much confidence in hospitalists. From my experiences, they seem to be more responsible to the hospital, rather than to my doctors. Fortunately, my oncologist's office and clinic are close to the hospital, so he generally visits me in the hospital. I don't feel that the communication channel through a hospitalist, to either my PCP or my oncologist, is complete. Partly because:
      2. I don't think the hospitalists understand the nuances of my two cancers, nor the interactions of my myriad of medications. I think they know something, but not nearly as much about my specifics as is known and understood by my oncologist. I'll add, however.....
      3. My local hospital (where I'm most likely to visit the E.R., and/or to be admitted) is close to my "first" oncologist. He understands my situation, but he's referred me to a specialized oncologist (and hospital), about 100 miles from home. I don't feel like the hospitalists, here, feel any cliseness to oncologists who are 100 miles away. Thus, if and when I find myself at the local hospital I take it upon myself to contact my oncologist and his team, at the specializing location (100 miles from here). - - - -
      4. NP's and PA's. Do I trust them, like I would trust my doctors? Yes, and No. ---- I thoroughly trust the opinions, diagnoses, and care from my NP's (and other nurses, at other levels of training and responsibility) who are associated, directly, with my doctors, either my PCP or either of my oncologists. I'm totally comfortable speaking and working with these NP's. I trust them, completely. I have confidence in their direct actions, and that they will, when necessary, contact the oncologist (or other specializing personnel). -- Do I have this same level of confidence in/with NP's and PA's who are associated with the hospital, or with the hospitalist(s)? No.

      18 days ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      My hospitalist didn't understand the nuance of a bad infection and the need for an antibiotic--so I certainly understand the cancer issue-- which is way more complicated than an infection.

      18 days ago
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  • downbutnotout's Avatar

    downbutnotout shared a photo

    Wall_not_who_i_used_to_be__depressed

    This is how I feel, only worse. I am afraid that I have lost myself.

    8 Comments
    • Lorie's Avatar
      Lorie

      BoiseB. Guess your sky has different powers than mine. Maybe i have to tweak the mind and use some positive thinking:). Thx..I'll try it
      Lorie

      3 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      It just might be in my DNA. My Native American ancestors were pretty obsessed with the dawn. In fact, Idaho is supposed to be a corruption of a Native American phrase (I forgot which tribe) that means behold the sun coming over the mountains . This winter I have watched many dawns In a snow storm.

      3 months ago
    • Lorie's Avatar
      Lorie

      No snow and no mountains in the sunny South but we sure do have some nice sunsets. They are something to be appreciated and your comment will help me try to do that thank you.
      "Down" sending hugs and vibes.

      3 months ago
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  • downbutnotout's Avatar

    downbutnotout asked a questionMultiple Myeloma

    Has your cancer affected you mentally? How would you say it has changed you?

    20 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      My cancer changed me. A lot.

      I am no longer stressed or a workaholic. These days, I take life pretty easy, mostly doing what I want to do when I want to do it.

      I wake up with a smile most of the time and I go to bed with a smile. I am loving life. I have time and desire to notice the sunrise, sunset, flowers, birds, cloud formations, ... you get the point.

      My faith has always been strong, but it keeps me sane and happy. I love life here on earth, but walking streets of gold with no worries in the world ... heaven (literally!)

      I was once much more tolerant of stress and stressful situations. Not now. I avoid them (and people who cause them) like the plague.

      Cancer has made me a better, happier person. I have met fabulous people because of my cancer that I would have never known. I wouldn't trade that for the world.

      Cancer has made me like me better. I now KNOW that I can face adversity with a smile and peace in my heart.

      2 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I have gotten hardened to some of the things that don't amount to a big ole pile of nothing. Drama, not interested, people that whine about having a cold, and go on and on about how tough life is, not interested, save it. On the other hand, having been close to the edge on 3 occasions myself, I am way softer now when it comes to seeing someone lose their life in any way. Watching both parents die from cancer was one of the hardest things I ever had to do. And, while I don't always get right to it, I try to take care of whatever my Sweetie wants, just as soon as I can. (Hey, you don't have to remind me every 6 months, I'll get to it eventually!) I'm sure there are other ways I've changed, but these are the top of the list, for today anyway.

      2 months ago
    • Marinace's Avatar
      Marinace

      Cancer took away my independence. I need help with chores, as surgery weakened my arm. I no longer have the ability to comprehend details or remember from one minute to the next.
      The meds have caused serious side effects, neuropathy in feet & hands, retinal hemorrhage and tear, that have left me unable to drive. All of this took away my career, and financial ability to live the life I worked so hard for, and the future I hoped to have with my grandchildren.

      2 months ago