• Flyboy's Avatar

    Flyboy asked a questionHead & Neck/Throat Cancer

    Dental problems and Hyperbaric treatments

    4 answers
    • welderdan's Avatar
      welderdan

      HBOT is a Grand treatment for sure. I was fortunate to have the VA cover the expense due to the damage the radiation did to my teeth and more specific, the bone lose..I saw some of the paperwork and was over $400 per treatent. Pray you can find a way to finance this..

      almost 2 years ago
    • Danfan714's Avatar
      Danfan714

      I will be having all of the rest of my teeth out next week. Same diagnosis same treatment, same issue afterward. I am 2 years out. I have to get them done. I will not be having HBO, I will keep you posted as to how I do. All I know is now they are painful. We will pay what we can when we can. Best of luck to you with your treatment.

      almost 2 years ago
    • kenw's Avatar
      kenw

      Early April, 2012 I was diagnosed with squamous cell cancer at base of my tongue. Prior to treatment with Erbitux (sp?)) and radiation, I had a comprehensive dental examination. My dentist, at the Special Care Dentistry here in Seattle, after consultation with my oncologist and radiologist, recommended that I have all the bicuspid molars in my lower jaw be extracted to mitigate any potential problems later on from the radiation.
      As luck would have it, I did develop some dental problems (not cancer-related) that required oral surgery on my lower jaw. To inhibit (to a large extent) necrosis of the bone and tissue (due to the destruction of the blood vessels from the radiation) at the surgery site and surrounding area, my dentist highly recommended that I undergo HBOT at the HBOT facility at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle. I did a total of thirty-five "dives" pre-op and ten more post-op. I have absolutely no gum tissue or bone problems since undergoing the HBOT.
      I consider myself extremely fortunate to have physicians with the foresight to recommend such prophylactic treatment. And to have the medical insurance (Medicare and Tricare For Life (from my 20+ years in the US Navy)) that would cover the treatment.
      If you medical insurance covers it, HBOT is the way to go. Although it may appear to be a dental problem, it is a direct result of the cancer treatment and should be treated as a medical issue, not a dental issue. YMMV.
      All the best,
      Ken W.

      almost 2 years ago
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    Flyboy wrote on ticklingcancer's wall

    What dose of gabapentim were you taking? My husband is dealing with the neuropathy and is on low dose gabapentin. Some days aren't too bad, but others really bad. Appreciate your input. Take care

    3 Comments
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      The thing about gabapentin is that you have to find the dose that works for you. My Dr gave me permission to try different doses until I found one that works. You can take up to 3500 mg but that's a pretty serious dose and could pretty much wipe him out. I started with 300 mg and there was no relief. I then moved to 600 mg. It was a little better but I was still in pain. I then moved it up to 900 mg and that seems to be working. I take it every morning. 900 mg is a pretty low dose and I experience zero side effects. His # may be 900, or it could be 1800. Speak with his Oncologist and trying different doses every morning until you find his magic #. Good Luck!!

      about 3 years ago
    • cancersister's Avatar
      cancersister

      dear tickling cancer i have toxic neuropathy and that doesnt work i tryed them all the only thing right now that gives me some what of a quaity of life is the fentanal pain patch it goes on every three days but it pumps continuous pain meds in every hour on the hour you can start on 50 mg i now need 75 and will need 100 soon the neuropathy in my legs are really bad and i am losing my mussles in my arms and my legs real bad just tellin g you facts, the patch really works ask you doctor it mioght help you have a qaility of lifew tell the doc that i will pray for you guy candy

      about 3 years ago
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      There are certainly extreme cases of neuropathy where the only relief is pain medicine. I'm sorry you have to go through that. My neuropathy was not that bad. I experienced numbness and pain in my hands and feet. The worst of it was when I completed chemo a little over a year ago. 95% of the damage has reversed itself and gabapentin offers me quite a bit of relief. Sounds like the pain meds are a good option for your situation but at the same time, we should also seek out alternative treatments and then if nothing offers any relief, then you may try to pain meds.

      about 3 years ago
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    Flyboy asked a questionHead & Neck/Throat Cancer

    frustration with side effects

    6 answers
    • packerbacker's Avatar
      packerbacker

      I have dry mouth since getting radiation last year for a tumor on my tongue. I have to drink a lot of liquid, as I'm sure your husband is familiar with. I eat a lot a casseroles, as the noodles go down easy, but I also eat burgers. I have no lower teeth and my dentures don't fit since radiation, so I do a lot of "gumming." I understand how he feels. I try to look at it as I'm eating because my body needs it so I'm strong enough to take the treatments I get. I do know I feel much worse when I don't eat enough, which is too often. Best of luck to you both!

      almost 4 years ago
    • IKickedIt's Avatar
      IKickedIt

      Yes, frustration is very much part of the experience. Unfortunately, I'm still encountering frustration more than a year later and wonder if I'll ever be satisfied with the new me and my limitations.

      I can completely understand his frustration with the food since I had problems eating while I was on chemo, too. I lost a lot of weight because I couldn't eat (I saw it as a little perk), but then gained it all back...and more...when I was able to eat again.

      However, a thought came to mind...yes, of course he is frustrated not being able to physically eat the foods he enjoys (let's face it, the tactile sensations are often just as satisfying as the the taste), but have your tried using the blender? A friend had his mouth wired shut when he had his jaw broken and joked about how good a Big Mac was in the blender once he got past the look of it. Just a thought. Perhaps with a bit of humor and drama, you could make it into quite an interesting experiment.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Flyboy's Avatar
      Flyboy

      I know he's entitled to a bad day, he's been thru alot. I try to understand but can't possibly now how he feels. Maybe this is another step in the process of recovering. The realization that it only took 10 days to start feeling crappy after treatment started, but it's going to take a lot longer to feel normal. Whatever his normal will be...I mentioned the food in the blender, the dietician talked about that too. He didn't seem too excited about that, tho I can't blame him. The idea to me also seems so awful. But never say never. I can relate to the "slide" factor, tho, always have gravy or sauces available for most everything. I never cooked that way before so I am learning too. thanks for your input. It helps talking with you all who are working thru the same issues. Take care.

      almost 4 years ago