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    GJSmith asked a questionNon-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

    Does Chemo RCHOP get harder to manager? Syptomes? Time of treatments? Is the worst "physically" effects to come?

    9 answers
    • Breadflower's Avatar
      Breadflower

      After each R-CHOP, I became weaker but didn't have terrible symptoms. It did become more difficult to go in for the chemo and have the symptoms start up again, dry mouth, etc. took a short walk three times a day, did what I could. Two years out, still in remission, I'm just grateful for having had this treatment available to me. It took several months to gain strength and be less clumsy. I was lucky I could tolerate it as well as I did. I wish the same for you. Hang in there. I'm planning a fun filled 70th year, wish you all the best. It does end!

      over 7 years ago
    • Sofi's Avatar
      Sofi

      Everyone has already given some great answers, so I won't repeat, but simply add.

      What got me through was acupuncture. I think a few people think this is really outside the box, but the studies continue to demonstrate its efficacy. I would not have coped nearly as well without it. We have a Penny George Institute for Health & Healing here in Minneapolis, and they have an excellent program. I am guessing there is a practitioner near you as well. I am NOT advocating acupuncture INSTEAD of chemo, I'm saying it is very helpful in managing symptoms.

      I did not do Neulasta shots as they were too painful. However, I have heard from oncologists that a dose of antihistamine (can't remember the brand name) ahead of time helps a lot. My numbers did drop to zero, but I just stayed home during the critical periods.

      I found prednisone extremely difficult, and eventually the doctor removed it from the cocktail. When my neuropathy started, he reduced the oncovine. (This was 5, 6 treatments in.)

      When symptoms are bad, just remember that you will get through it, and respect your own reactions. Take care of yourself and allow others to take care of you. And remember, you may be one of those lucky ones who sorta skates through it!

      Finally, find someone who can help you after chemo with physical and/or occupational therapy. Chemo is hard on the body, and it takes some work to recover. Family and friends sometimes figure after chemo, you're all done!, and don't consider you need some time to heal.

      All the best to you.

      over 7 years ago
    • bmymom's Avatar
      bmymom

      I worry about it getting worse, too. Just finished my second, and I cannot say I feel worse, because I felt pretty poorly last time for nearly 2 weeks, but I have noticed tingling and numbness, which is freaking me out. My cancer survivor pen-pal said she did pretty well throughout all her treatments, just generally felt tired. So everyone is different, but I am hoping I handle it as well as she did. We shall see - 2 down, 4 to go!

      over 7 years ago
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    GJSmith shared an experience

    Side Effects (Chemo brain): Vaugness and loss of ability to "communicate". OCD traits needed to manage tasks. Makes for "difficult" understanding with friends & family

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    GJSmith shared an experience

    Clinical Trial (Ibrtinib Antibody): In conjunction with RCHOP Chemo. Possible placebo. No additional side eccects. Singaporeian based triel. 2nd subject in Australia.

  • GJSmith's Avatar

    GJSmith shared an experience

    Drug or Chemo Therapy (Chemotherapy): Side effects mostly as expected. No Nauesa dramas however, "random" effect aplenty. Fatigue & memory loss impactful.

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    GJSmith shared an experience

    Procedure or Surgery (Surgery): Small needle biopsy x 6 and tumour core biopsy