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    HotRodTodd asked a questionProstate Cancer

    Shouldn't the US instead of the UK be leading the way in this?

    8 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Interesting answers thank you all for posting.

      3 months ago
    • Whitey61's Avatar
      Whitey61

      There are more than 10 prostate cancer Oncologists in the Nation....they are called Genetourinary Oncologists that have a specialty in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment.

      3 months ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      @whItEy,
      Genitourinary oncology encompasses more than the prostate, specifically the cancers that arise within the pelvic cradle. There are still less than 10 oncologists who specialize in prostate cancer only. There is a new book out called, "The Key to Prostate Cancer" by Mark Scholz...a must read for any prostate cancer patient who specifically goes over these statistics...havibg worked in oncology for years and havibg many patients with this disease, I stand by my post.

      3 months ago
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    HotRodTodd asked a questionProstate Cancer

    Pallitative Care - When can you get on it, what will change, what do they do for you?

    7 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Timing is everything! A blog i wrote on this subject was published today :)

      https://lungcancer.net/living/palliative-care-should-you-care/

      7 months ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Palliative care IS NOT hospice. As well, palliative care can be the wisest choice. Its aim is to maintain the highest possible quality of life. We all want "the cure." We all chase "the cure" - but at what cost? Chasing "the cure" can actually shorten our lives, and drastically lower life's quality as compared to the compassionate aims of palliative care.

      Today, there seems to be a blending of carefully measured treatment with traditional palliation. That is to make the patient as comfortable as possible, while applying therapy designed to contain or slow the disease process so as to lengthen that life even more - and in a tolerable manner.

      Say that you are 80+ years old and have a cancer which is potentially curable via aggressive therapy. The risk is that receiving aggressive therapy can do so much damage to your organs that you may die prematurely - but without cancer. Does that sound reasonable? Rather, palliation seeks to treat the patient so as to provide as much comfort as possible, knowing the patient's limitations and the cancer's potential. It is a balancing act.

      Life on this earth ends. We know that. Today? Tomorrow? In 20 years? A mystery. Rather, if the cancer can be slowed down while the patient is able to experience and enjoy life, it is a win-win.

      7 months ago
    • Lauraandmary's Avatar
      Lauraandmary

      Palliative care is not just for the terminally ill; it is for anyone that is suffering from a disease that causes distress, whether it be physical, spiritual, emotional, etc.
      The focus of palliative care is quality of life. I believe every patient with a cancer diagnosis should receive a palliative care consult.
      You do not have to give up your other doctors (such as oncologists); ideally, palliative care should work hand-in-hand with your doctor.

      7 months ago
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