• jad's Avatar
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    jad asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Immune system & COVID-19

    4 answers
    • lynn1950's Avatar
      lynn1950

      I winder the same thing. Is one's immune system compromised despite having CBCs that show counts in the normal range?

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I would think that since your CBCs are normal, you are at normal risk for the coronavirus.

      4 months ago
    • ChildOfGod4570's Avatar
      ChildOfGod4570

      I had been thinking the same thing. I am 6.5 years post surgery and just had a good report from my oncologist. HUGS and God bless.

      4 months ago
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    jad asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Sunblock for radiation?

    12 answers
    • TerriL's Avatar
      TerriL

      I was also told to make sure there was nothing on my skin as it could affect the radiation

      4 months ago
    • omaalyce's Avatar
      omaalyce

      Good advice Bengal-anything and everything you try should be tested first-one never knows what might be sensitive to your skin.

      4 months ago
    • ChicagoSandy's Avatar
      ChicagoSandy

      Your skin should be clean and ABSOLUTELY BARE when you hop on to the table. (That means showering off ALL the soap and not using any moisturizers, creams or lotions on the skin over the area to be irradiated). You want NOTHING preventing the radiation beams from penetrating your skin into the tumor cavity! The time for emollients (your choice of whatever you find soothing--I used aloe gel, calendula and Aquaphor) is AFTER each session and at bedtime.

      The confusion lies in the word "radiation." Sunblock protects against UVA & UVB radiation. But imaging and treatment radiation are a different type of radiation from light (whether UV or IR). The time to use sunblock is if your irradiated skin is exposed to sun afterward--the last thing you need is further skin damage. (Best to cover up, unless it's a part of your skin--like your face--that can't be covered). Just make sure it's washed off thoroughly before each radiation treatment session.

      4 months ago
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    jad asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Is Medicare still paying?

    9 answers
    • ChicagoSandy's Avatar
      ChicagoSandy

      If you have a Medicare Part B or Advantage (Part C) plan, it will be covered--but only if one of your oncologists writes you a prescription for a "cranial prosthesis" and you buy it from a facility that specializes in hair solutions for cancer patients and takes your particular supplement's reimbursement. Not all do.

      Unlike mastectomy bras (2 per year) and prostheses (1 per breast every 2 years), which Federal law requires Medicare supplements and private insurance to cover--even if you had only a lumpectomy, which is considered a "partial mastectomy." (Has to be a specific mastectomy bra--with pockets for prostheses, not just the bra of your choice).

      And lymphedema compression wear (sleeves, gauntlets, gloves) are still not covered under Medicare or its supplements. Some private insurance does cover it, but not all vendors accept your insurance (when I got mine, before Medicare, the breast-cancer boutique where I bought it only accepted BCBS--which I didn't have at the time and didn't get till I got on Medicare). Nag your Reps. & Sens. to pass the bipartisan, bicameral Lymphedema Treatment Act, which has been stuck in committee forever.

      10 months ago
    • msndrstood's Avatar
      msndrstood

      I had a prescription for a 'cranial prosthesis' and traditional Medicare still did not cover the wig, I am too young for a medigap policy, so I don't know if that would cover it. I would call first to find out.

      10 months ago
    • ChicagoSandy's Avatar
      ChicagoSandy

      Trad Medicare (A&B) w/o a supplement is better than nothing but still very rudimentary as to what it covers. I didn't realize that you can't buy a supplement if you're on Medicare for any reason other than age. Live & learn.
      Supplements are expensive, but much less so than regular health insurance (and the premiums are income-related sliding-scale)--we're paying less than half for our BCBS Plan F than we did for our United Health Choice Plus PPO before I hit 65. (My husband is a cardiologist/primary care doc, and he finds that BCBS is much better than United or Aetna at covering durable medical equipment like braces, splints, nebulizers, CPAPs & assistive devices).

      10 months ago