• jcunningham's Avatar

    jcunningham asked a questionEndometrial (Uterine) Cancer

    lymphedema

    7 answers
    • Ivy's Avatar
      Ivy

      I agree with the comments above. My noticeable lymphedema began the year after my chemo and radiation finished. The number of lymph nodes that were removed during your surgery will probably determine the intensity of your lymphedema. You can ask your surgeon, and you can also ask for a prescription for therapy. A well-trained lymphedema therapist will want to know which lymph nodes were removed and will teach you how to do a gentle massage that will help to alleviate the problem. The other suggestions, such as wearing compression stockings, elevating the legs, and such are a necessity. (These days, every time I sit at home I try to head for the recliner that will elevate my lower legs.) The therapist can help you determine which compression degree you require. (I have to wear 20-30 knee high stockings all the time except for sleeping.) You may require higher or lower compression, so it's important to have a professional help you sort it out. If you like to swim and have access to a pool, being in waist high or chest high water also helps because the pressure of the water will press the lymph fluid higher in the body, which would have happened normally if you had all your lymph nodes. I'm very sorry to say that this is a fact of life for many of us, along with the other side effects often noted on this site. Cancer surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation all damage the body greatly. It is the price we pay for being alive after treatment. So do get treatment quickly and get into a regimen that will control your lymphedema. If I skip a day of compression stockings, my lower legs ache. That's certainly unpleasant, so do all you can to avoid it. Good luck with getting it treated and managed for minimum distress.

      2 days ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Sigh.

      Please look up a supplement called "nattokinese" which is something from an Asian fermented food called 'natto' or fermented soybeans.

      The food comes organically and it is super easy but messy to make at home.

      Apparently vitamins K2 & K3 can help alleviate lymphodema but needs be used in early stages to prevent it completely.

      2 days ago
    • jcunningham's Avatar
      jcunningham

      Thank you all for your feedback. I went to my doctor yesterday and will have an ultrasound today to rule out blood clots. Then begin looking at treatment for edema. I hate the idea of compression stockings nor just because of the look but because since my hysterectomy I am always so hot! Yay. Summer heat and heavy socks. I want to look at treatments that don't involve meds hopefully. Tired of pharmaceuticals in my life. Supplements I can cope with.

      about 23 hours ago
  • jcunningham's Avatar

    jcunningham started following

    Question: lymphedema

  • jcunningham's Avatar

    jcunningham started following

  • jcunningham's Avatar
  • jcunningham's Avatar

    jcunningham started following

  • jcunningham's Avatar

    jcunningham asked a questionEndometrial (Uterine) Cancer

    Long Term Changes From Cancer

    15 answers
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      Hi! I am in the same boat right now. I finished treatment in July. I was unable to finish the trial due to side effects which made it hard because I had no idea my last treatment would be my last. So far my scans have been good. Which is wonderful. However I am left with autoimmune disease. So I have to live in constant pain or on steroids. Right now
      I am on steroids and I hate them. I look in the mirror and I don't recognize myself. I am happy to have survived and am a lot stronger than I ever thought I was. I also recently found out my left hip is collapsed and fractured from the radiation and the cancer. So I am very grateful to be alive but trying to understand the new me. So I know how you feel. I also lost my brother to cancer a month ago. So my doctors suggested some counseling. I haven't called yet, but I think I will look into it or at least a good support group. I wish you all the best! Sandi

      about 1 month ago
    • rene2's Avatar
      rene2

      I am 6 months post-chemo (R-CHOP). I spent about four years before my diagnosis feeling "not normal". I experienced extreme fatigue, memory loss, brain fog, sleeplessness (wide awake and exhausted at the same time), and just generally didn't feel well. The maddening part was that every single blood test came back normal. Even the endocrinologist couldn't find anything. I had been begging the doctors to tell me it wasn't in my head, but none of them could do that. So, when I was finally diagnosed I was excited that I finally knew what had been making me feel so bad for so long!

      The excitement showed in my face and when I talked to people. I was bald from the chemo (and in Florida it was too hot for hats and wigs) so people would ask me what type of cancer I had or just strike up a conversation with me about it and they were always amazed at how upbeat and happy I was.

      Then I finished my treatment. I became sad. Very sad and weepy and emotional. I couldn't believe it and I tried to deny and convince myself to just get over it, but I couldn't. Finally I talked to my doctor and she said it's very common for patients to feel that way post-treatment. She recommended an anti-depressant, but I declined. I was sad, but I wasn't suicidal or despondent so I thought I could tough it out. A few weeks later I gave in and called her for the prescription. I feel so much better now and hopefully soon I'll be able to quit taking it, but for now I owe it to myself and my family to be the best I can be.

      I'm 50 pounds heavier than my lowest weight during my initial treatment. I still don't have the focus, stamina, or strength I had before treatment. I'm different and I know it. This is my new normal. I expect someday in the future I'll have another new normal. I'm alive and whatever normal may be is fine with me.

      Please talk to your doctor or a counselor who has experience with cancer patients. There's help for understanding all the changes we've been through and accepting who we are now. All the best to you. Cheryl

      about 1 month ago
    • jcunningham's Avatar
      jcunningham

      Thank you all for your encouragement and kind words. The best part about "whatnext"--others feel similar to me and have ideas about how to handle. Please know that I keep all of you who have shared your struggles in my thoughts and prayers. Praying that you find comforts makes me less focused on my own TINY problems.

      about 1 month ago