• jet's Avatar

    jet asked a questionLung Cancer

    RBC

    • KarenG_WN's Avatar
      KarenG_WN

      Hi jet,

      I bet that others on here have taken Procrit. If you still don't get any feedback, you may just want to rephrase the question as, "has anyone taken Procrit?" instead of RBC. Just a suggestion. I'll keep an eye on this for you and see if I can help get you some insight from others.

      Thanks!
      Karen

      almost 5 years ago
  • jet's Avatar

    jet wrote on brookep's wall

    Wishing you well,,,I have stage 4 lung Cancer. Did you by any change get the shot Procrit

    1 Comment
    • brookep's Avatar
      brookep

      My dad had Stage 4 small cell lung carcinoma...he has been through a round of radiation and will be on chemo forever...we found the cancer in Aug and by Sept, it was found in his brain, bones and liver as well. A lot of life changing info in such a short amount of time. It has been one XXX of a ride...

      almost 5 years ago
  • jet's Avatar

    jet asked a questionLung Cancer

    Bowel Movements

    5 answers
    • shauna0915's Avatar
      shauna0915

      As a primary caregiver for my dad, who was totally obsessed with his bowel habits, I learned quite a bit about this subject. I hope you find it helpful.

      I would suggest getting Benefiber and adding it to everything you can... coffee, tea, cereal, water, any soft foods you eat that it can be mixed into. Walmart has an Equate version of it which costs less but it doesn't mix as well, especially in beverages. The Benefiber powder is tasteless and colorless so you really don't even know it's there. We gave it to my dad, in addition to a stool softener with laxative in it every night.

      If things get too bound (if you don't have a bowel movement within 3 days) you need to let your doctor know. What we were told to use for my dad was a Fleet enema to unblock and get a bottle of Magnesium Citrate to drink. You'll want to also get a some Sprite or 7-Up to mix it with. The magnesium citrate is a clear liquid that usually comes in a lemon flavor so it's best to mix it with a lemon-lime soda, about a 50/50 mix or to taste (it can be quite sour). Be prepared that when things do finally break loose you may want to stay close to the restroom for a few hours.

      Once you get things flowing again, stick with the fiber powder and eat as many high fiber foods as you can. Dairy will contribute to binding things up, in addition to your meds, so make sure you add the fiber powder to every dairy product you can. If you like yogurt get Activia.

      I wish you all the best in your journey and would be pleased to help with any information I can. As always, you should run things by your doctor(s) before adding anything to your medicine regimen to be sure there will be no interaction with what you currently take.

      almost 5 years ago
    • shauna0915's Avatar
      shauna0915

      Oh, I forgot to add... try to walk as much as you can. The more active you can be, the better chance you have of getting things moving. My dad used to do a (please excuse the expression) "poopy dance". :o) When his cancer progressed to the point that he couldn't go for walks, he would still get up with his walker and "wiggle" around the living room for a few minutes at a time. The activity seemed to help get things moving again, with the assistance of the things mentioned above. Like I said, he was pretty obsessed with his bowel habits. Good luck.

      almost 5 years ago
    • christina's Avatar
      christina

      home enemas

      over 4 years ago
  • jet's Avatar

    jet started following

  • jet's Avatar

    jet asked a questionLung Cancer

    what happens after your hair falls out

    5 answers
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      Depends are how far apart your treatments are, which drugs are being used, and how fast your hair grows normally. But even if there is some regrowth between treatments, it is likely to just be a little fuzz. Most chemo drugs kill fast growing cells and the cells that produce hair are among the fastest. So there could be a little regrowth between treatments, but most likely most of those cells will again be killed off with the next treatment.

      almost 5 years ago
    • ladysuccess' Avatar
      ladysuccess

      Type your answer here...I went to ACS and told them I needed a wig. I signed a paper that I was taking chemo and got a wig that was so near like my own hair that when I did transition to a wig very few people knew the difference. There are so many options out there, I have friends who even got clown-type wigs and had fun with them...bright red, purple, you name it. Also you can do caps, turbans, I loved bandanas.

      over 4 years ago
    • alivenwell's Avatar
      alivenwell

      Chemo is designed to affect fast growing cells like those in hair follicles or cancerous tissue. You may want to research new techniques they are using to retain hair. There was something recent in the news about it.

      over 3 years ago
  • jet's Avatar

    jet asked a questionLung Cancer

    I have had my second chemo treatment. The Dr wants to give me Procrit injection tomorrow has any one had I have read it

    • Vickie's Avatar
      Vickie

      Procrit is given as sub cutaneous injection, to help raise blood counts, that are lowered from the chemotherapy. I was taking it for low red blood cell count, due to MDS/MPD dx...it does work well, and you should have no problems with it. God Bless

      almost 5 years ago
    • jet's Avatar
      jet

      Thank you Vickie....I had read a lot of bad stuff (side effect from it). You have made me feel better.

      almost 5 years ago
    • geema1952's Avatar
      geema1952

      I took it the day after each one of my chemo treatments. I had no problems with it.

      about 4 years ago