• Julesmom's Avatar

    Julesmom shared a photo

    Wall_i_ve_learned_alot

    Having dealt with cancer for a few years now, I have learned a lot of this in this quote. Things will certainly change and we need those people in our lives that love us and support us.

    1 Comment
  • Julesmom's Avatar
  • Julesmom's Avatar

    Julesmom asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Is it normal to have bone and joint pain a few years out of treatments?

    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      Yes! I have osteo-arthtitis so it 's hard to judge how much of my debilitating bone and joint pain comes from that and how much from treatment. All I know is it's been much worse. I am about a year and a half beyond treatment. I was on anastrozole for a little over a year. I was so fatigued and stiff and achy that it was a lost year. I had no energy and every movement hurt. I made the decision to stop the anastrozole the end of August. Within days I felt more like myself. I tried a couple of other AI's and had a bad reaction. Right now I am not taking anything. I still have joint and bone pain but at a much more manageable level.

      7 months ago
    • ChicagoSandy's Avatar
      ChicagoSandy

      No bone pain for me, but joint pain in ankles, shoulders, and lumbar spine (pre-existing degenerative disk disease). Knees okay--they've been "bionic" since before bc. Sometimes trigger finger (but it's transient) and sore stiff knuckles. Some warn that the joint pain from AIs can be cumulative, but except for my back it's improved over the years (and a 50-lb. hard-earned weight loss has helped too).

      7 months ago
    • lynn1950's Avatar
      lynn1950

      Except for bionic knees, ditto ChicagoSandy. I lost 30 pounds. I am 7 pounds over my goal. My GP thinks completing AIs a little over a year ago has a lot to do with the weight loss.

      7 months ago
  • Julesmom's Avatar
  • Julesmom's Avatar

    Julesmom asked a questionBreast Cancer

    For the breast cancer patients/survivors, how often does this happen to you?

    13 answers
    • gpgirl70's Avatar
      gpgirl70

      I keep expecting to have that reaction because I don’t have breasts but haven’t noticed any glances. The lack of glances at my chest has been empowering. I really learned to be comfortable with my post-mastectomy body.

      7 months ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      I'm late, but hope it gives someone a little laugh. I started volunteering in the Boy Scouts in 1981. I wore my uniform well. Skip to 2006 when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I told my boys & leaders that I had cancer. When asked what kind or where, the conversation ended. I knew everyone of them would be looking at my chest at every meeting. One night something was brought up & I slipped up. The cat was out of the bag. The guys had been making bets on where it was. We all laughed. They continued to be gentlemen until I retired my uniform in 2013

      about 1 month ago
    • Pego's Avatar
      Pego

      I had a left mastectomy last August. Shortly after I returned to work one morning I realized shortly after I got there I had forgot something! I was flat on one side! I hurried over to a co-workers cube who had a double (and reconstructive surgery) number of years ago and said, “....I forgot something today!” She dropped her gaze, and we just laughed! It was at this point that I decided I didn’t care if I put something in that left side or not. They are uncomfortable and now in summer hot! I’ve been working from home for months and never worry about it. I can’t say eyes drop and people look directly at my chest. Cancer is an uncomfortable topic, add the work breast and it becomes awkward. How we react is how we can make others feel more comfortable.

      1 day ago
  • Julesmom's Avatar

    Julesmom shared a photo

    Wall_i_am_still_standing

    For all the Sisters that have fought or still fighting off breast cancer.