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    Kian asked a questionOvarian and Fallopian Tube Cancer

    Hi, My mother was just diagnosed with ovarian caner. Our next step is seeing the oncologist for treatment/surgery.

    14 answers
    • Brielle's Avatar
      Brielle

      Kian, Good luck with your visit. I wanted to share some things my daughters did that were very helpful after surgery and chemotherapy started. They gave me useful items that I continue to use after a year and a half. These included: an electric razor, soft tooth brush, products from the American Cancer Society guide online : Understanding Chemotherapy using the suggested lists for toothpaste, lotion, detergents, cleaning supplies, etc. They copied this guide and put it in a notebook that I refer to frequently. They bought yoga pants and sports bras that have been so comfortable to wear after surgery and during chemo treatments. While we all have different needs, these are some ideas that I wanted to share.

      about 4 years ago
    • derbygirl's Avatar
      derbygirl

      As someone who spent years working in a doctors office, I can tell you that no matter what you want to ask in the office, you always walk out having forgotten something. So what I always told patients to do was to start writing your questions down at home. This way you have time, as a family, to think of things that you want the doctor to discuss. When you get there, give the paper to the nurse or assistant to give the doctor so he/she can look it over before coming into the room. This way the doctor has an idea what you want to discuss and need answered. Then I'd make sure that the doctor had time in his schedule to look over the paper more carefully and email or write or call the patient with a follow up when he had more time. We would schedule time in his day to make phone calls so I made sure to bring those important papers to his attention. A doctors time is limited so giving them the opportunity to call later with more information at their convenience is a help to them. If your questions need more discussion, you can always schedule another appointment but ask them to give you more time. Try to make it at the end of the day when a doctors schedule is generally less hectic. Sometimes patients can be given a 30 minute appointment instead of the customary 15 minutes. Make sure you find out what the plan is regarding surgery, chemo, radiation and also ask the doctor about the stage of the cancer. Take along plenty of paper and a pen to write things down and have a pocket calendar with you to write dates down for treatments, visits etc. Make sure you have a complete list of your mother's medications and her surgical history with you so the doctor has that. Ask the doctor for pamphlets or information to read at home and phone numbers for the doctor, nurse, hospital, and support groups in your area for your entire family. As far as researching on the internet, please remember that the internet gives generalized information, not personalized. The internet can be a great resource but doctors cringe every time a patient says they read something online. I hope this helps and I wish your mother the best of luck and I'm sending my thoughts and prayers to your entire family. Remember that we are all here for you anytime you need to talk. Take care and keep us updated.

      about 4 years ago
    • Milagros' Avatar
      Milagros

      Buenos Día, me realice el examen CA-125 y me aparece que los niveles son de 27.2 y los valores normales según el test deberían estar entre :0.0 - 21.0, que debo hacer, ¿repetir el test.?

      almost 4 years ago
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    Procedure or Surgery: Waiting to see when surgery will occur and what will be done.

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    Drug or Chemo Therapy: Waiting for information on when Chemo will start and how it will help with the cancer.

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    Oh No (Diagnosed)

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