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    lynngenes asked a questionNon-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

    Parents of young survivors

    7 answers
    • Gymmom's Avatar
      Gymmom

      I don't think you ever get over that fear. It's most important to not transfer your fears to your daughter like geekling said. If she already lives with that fear, see if you can find someone to help her learn to live more in the moment. To pretend it won't happen isn't realistic, because it can. Another thing, if your daughter talks with a professional, my personal suggestion is to let her do that privately - and the same with you if necessary. Find someone who will see you both but separately. That may give them a lot more tools in helping each of you. Sometimes (often) children will hold back if they sense that the parent in the room may not be able to handle what she really wants to say. You might find yourself holding back as well so as not to upset her. That wouldn't be helpful to either of you. I wish you the best. You sound like a wonderful parent.

      over 3 years ago
    • Sharlie's Avatar
      Sharlie

      As with the others, I don't think we ever get over it but we can't let the fear take over. It's pretty much a truth that once we cross that line and get that initial diagnosis, it's always there in the back of our minds and that's where it should stay. We should be educated and know what kinds of symptoms to be aware of but we should live our life to the fullest. I'm glad your daughter has finished her treatments in time to truly enjoy her teen years and drive you crazy -- lol. I wasn't sure my daughter (now grown) and I would survive her teen years and her daughter is now almost nine. Can't wait to see how it goes for her. Sending you and your daughter peaceful and joyful energy.

      over 3 years ago
    • DJS's Avatar
      DJS

      Like everyone here has said: you don't get over it. However since cancer, when confronted by other problems in my life, most times I say to myself 'I got through cancer and I can get through this.' Also, having had cancer tends to help put things in perspective. For example, after losing my hair, bad hair days aren't as big a deal. I don't know what my future holds; I'm not even sure I have much of a future -- none of us get that promise. One of the many gifts I got from cancer is the days that I do have are so much more fun, sweeter, carefree and appreciated. I have hope for the future, but I make sure I enjoy what I have.

      over 3 years ago
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    Side Effects (Low white blood cell counts (neutropenia))

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    Side Effects (Hair loss (alopecia))