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    MelMom asked a questionLeukemia

    Do you find that when you're talking to a friend or family member about the risks of cancer that they don't get it?

    9 answers
    • Carolina105's Avatar
      Carolina105

      You don't "get it" until it happens to you. You can talk to family & friends all you want, but until they are diagnoised with cancer themselves they really don't get it. After my PLL diagnois I told very few people, didn't post it on social media,etc. It didn't take long to realize I needed to lower my expectations of family & friends. They did not have a clue how I felt, which can be a lonely feeling.

      4 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      @Live, I have seen several people that talked the big talk of "I will never take that poison, or it's the treatment that kills you, not the cancer"! But they tend to change that attitude when they are told that they could die within xx months without treatment. That's why I want to hear from people's personal experience, not what I heard she said that her brothers third cousins wifes niece that had it and she died.

      3 months ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      I walked away but you already know that GregP_WN. I was thrown back down the chute with more lies and other demeaning tales of fairies

      3 months ago
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    MelMom asked a questionLeukemia

    Have you met more new people that have become friends than you have lost since your cancer?

    6 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I didn't have anyone near us during our first two diagnoses, it was just me and Donna. She had to be the one to take care of me and anything that I couldn't so we didn't have any friends to lose in that case. We had just moved to Memphis and literally knew nobody other than the office I worked at. They were helpful, but it's not like living in your home town where you know lots of people and have family there. We got by just fine, but it sure would have been easier if there would have been people around.

      During my third dx, we were back at home and were lucky enough to have family close by and what friends we have, there weren't any of them that were a part of my treatment, so no help, but didn't have anyone that we lost. On the other side of that, I had a few that asked if we needed anything, and also had competitors in our business ask if we needed help keeping business going or help with any jobs. That was a nice surprise. Sometimes you're better off without those who can't be there when needed anyway.

      over 1 year ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      My best friend since high school (and I'm 51...) started pulling away after my diagnosis. Then my mom get very ill, and my good buddy started pulling away more. Didn't bother to go to my mom's memorial service because she was too busy w/her son's soccer. Finally, she twisted my words & decided I was just trying to upset her when I expressed how glad I was that her local police dept had stopped a would-be Columbine incident at her son's HS before the kid even got his hands on a gun. So she decided she was done with me. Said it in those terms. I think she was just looking for an excuse to finally cut ties completely. The sad thing is, she just "found God". Her actions sure don't seem like those of a good Christian, but then I'm not Christian, so what do I know?

      over 1 year ago
    • thoraxe23's Avatar
      thoraxe23

      I actually did my senior seminar paper partially addressing this issue, influenced additionally with my own personal experience, and I found that some people just react in that way because they don't know how else to react to the situation. This doesn't mean that they don't care, it is just their way of dealing with the issue. In the same way, certain people might react in a completely opposite manner because of the same thing. Just try to understand that especially for those who are closest to you, will react in certain ways. This does not mean they do not care, but their body or mind may react in a certain way from something which -- frankly -- is a lot to process for them, too.

      I'm not saying those individuals will not eventually come around; I would suggest to perhaps give them a bit of space and then reach out when you think they are ready to reconnect.

      over 1 year ago
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    MelMom shared a photo

    Wall_ofatumamab

    Attention CLL patients - there is a new option just approved by the FDA for patients who are in complete or partial response after at least two lines of therapy for recurrent or progressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Ofatumumab was previously approved for the treatment of previously untreated patients with CLL for whom fludarabine-based therapy was considered inappropriate and also for patients with CLL refractory to fludarabine and alemtuzumab.

    http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/InformationOnDrugs/ApprovedDrugs/ucm482308.htm