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    Other Care (More Tests Needed November 2012.): I have begun having new symptoms. Time for more testing.... MRI here I come. When I was diagnosed initially my cancer was in one lymph node out of 21 removed. Fingers crossed that it has not returned, if so, then I hope I am still treatable. I am not ready to give up the fight just yet. :) I wish you blessings on your own individual journeys.

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    Celebration (As of August 2012 I have been cancer free 3 years.): As a committee member for Relay for Life I celebrate the journeys of families like mine, mourn their losses, and work hand in hand with community members in hopes of one day living in a "World with More Birthdays."

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    Drug or Chemo Therapy (Nausea medicine): I strongly encourage the use of anti-nausea meds. Some people have used marijuana to control nausea and help with eating. I have no problem with a person who uses marijuana to control pain, decrease nausea, or encourage appetite. My niece would smoke on occasion to control her pain and nausea. My sister once said to me, "I never thought I would hear myself telling my daughter to go smoke a joint in her room." (I laughed.) It is amazing how your perception on life can change given the right circumstances.
    Honestly, a friend dropped of a "package" at my garage door with a note that just said, "I hope this helps you, it is all I know to do for you." Even though I never smoked it....I felt a little "gangsta" just getting it. It was nice to know that someone cared enough to go to so much trouble just to make me feel better. To this day, if you asked me who exactly it was, I would deny knowing. : ) I took my anti-nausea meds and had a ton of hugs.

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    Drug or Chemo Therapy (Chemotherapy): At first I tolerated chemo well. It was not until later on in treatment that the nausea and exhaustion hit home hard. I did only what I could do, some days that was nothing more than a shower. Back to bed, maybe some tea or peanut butter on a graham cracker. Do what you can. Everyone seems to have a different journey.

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    Procedure or Surgery (Implant chemotherapy port): This was a very easy outpatient procedure. Since it is a sterile procedure I was draped so that I had just a small space for a staff member to peek in and ask "how are you doing in there?" I liked that because they had to get on their knees to do it, and it helped to have someone talk to me. I had a mesh port inserted subcutaneously to make chemotherapy easier. At least no needle pokes besides the ones from drawing blood to check levels. It was a lot easier to have my chemo enter directly into a port, especially since I had to do two days of at home chemo.

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    Procedure or Surgery (Colon surgery (colectomy or hemicolectomy)): I was looking at this and hoping everyone does not base their expectations on my chart. The truth is, I am a HUGE BABY when it comes to being ill. However, athough my surgery went as expected, the recovery seemed to take forever. I was tired and frustrated two weeks post surgery. I was told I was coming along well considering the extent of my surgery. Considering I had a large percentage of my large colon (almost half) removed as well as my appendix, what did I expect? If you know me you would say....to be up doing the fox trot in three days or less. Still coming....chemo.