• mmoorewia's Avatar

    mmoorewia started following

    User: t4feb29803

  • mmoorewia's Avatar

    mmoorewia started following

    User: mmoorewia

  • mmoorewia's Avatar

    mmoorewia shared an experience

    Milestones (Completed chemotherapy and radiation treatments.): The long drive to Cleveland Clinic (98 miles each way) everyday for the past 9 weeks was tiring but is finally over. Now we wait for follow up in May. Scared but full of hope.

  • mmoorewia's Avatar
  • mmoorewia's Avatar

    mmoorewia asked a questionEsophagus (Esophageal) Cancer

    Chemo/radiation treatments ended two weeks ago. Husband is on an emotional rollercoaster - is that common?

    14 answers
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      First I want to say that Chemobrain is very real and it takes people different times to get over it. Radiation also has lingering effects (that I was not told about). Also sometimes we have expectations for recovery that are unrealistic. The body needs to heal and it needs to heal for more than two weeks after treatment ends.
      Second cancer represents a loss (physical, a part of the body, financial, a big one, and some time life) we must grieve for these losses. I beleive that meltdown is part of the greiving process. You might find some litature on grief and find a way to help him through this process.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BLBragg's Avatar
      BLBragg

      Hi. My husband had these same types of feelings soon after treatment was over. In fact after his 6 month check up where he was told there was no cancer...he continued to be depressed and then angry. It took him about a year to get rid of the anger and feelings of "gloom and doom." I am happy to report, this past year he has been much better but I suspect as we get closer to his next CT scan, his mood will change.Hang in there, it is a difficult time for you both and our prayers are with you.

      almost 4 years ago
    • LubeDude's Avatar
      LubeDude

      I was a 4 stage EC patient and chose to go to battle against an enemy with no feelings or sympathy. I chose to fight with determination to win. Many patients don't win but give the fight of their life and leave this world knowing they are fighters. Those of us that survive often go through a stage of guilt because we are still here and so many are not. We are all different in personality, attitude, and personal life styles but we all share the same thing and that is the choice to fight and win or the choice to give up and die. The easy way is to let things run there course and put forth very little effort to survive. What a selfish thing to do to those that love you and care about you.
      I look at my battle as the most worthwhile thing I have ever done in my life for those that care and love me. I owed it to them regardless of how I felt about myself. My new definition of true love doesn't even include me. It is what I have done and what I can do for those I owe. I have nothing else to prove to myself because I have done what was best for all involved. Sometimes we have to look at all the pros and cons and be truthful with self to make the choice. When you make the choice to fight and win sometimes you have to fight within yourself to understand why today is today. The answers are there if you open your mind and realize the reasons you are alive. When the meltdowns hit, just cry them out, they will pass and your life goes on. Only survivors know what this is all about and you are not alone. Handle it the best way that works and never ever give up. I wish you the best and hope every day is a better day. Fight to Win, Win to Live !!!

      over 2 years ago
  • mmoorewia's Avatar

    mmoorewia shared an experience

    Drug or Chemo Therapy (Chemotherapy): My husband completed his final round of chemotherapy yesterday. He's feeling quite ragged but all symptoms are being controlled well with medications.He has 5 more radiation treatments and is looking forward to gaining some strength back and praying this is a recovery as his reconstructive surgery depends on it.