• OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    Who else had just a blast on Thanksgiving day watching everyone eat all the great food?

    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      Hey, you were there. I can't decide if you're being sarcastic or if you really did enjoy watching others enjoy the food. But, you were there! I was just talking about all the stuff we're left to deal with after diagnosis and treatment on another question. Is it all worth it? Only you can answer that question for your own situation. But, you were there!

      8 days ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      We decided to cancel Thanksgiving. My mother was not feeling well and our 43-year-old son passed away from a heart attack last November ... somehow, no one really had the push to go to the effort to have Thanksgiving.

      I have to say, it was pretty sad not "doing" Thanksgiving, even if our numbers would be very small ... next year, God willing, i think Thanksgiving is going to happen.

      8 days ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Part of what we enjoy is just being together. Being able to eat would be good too. I can eat a good bit as long as I have gravy, but not like it used to be. I feel your eating pains.

      8 days ago
  • OldGuy's Avatar
  • OldGuy's Avatar
  • OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    How do you stay positive that your treatment will be successful when others around you are dying?

    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Having received a 99.5% chance of succumbing to any one of the three cancers over the past 11 years (even all three simultaneously)y, or to the allogeneic stem cell transplant I received, or to the Graft-versus-Host-Disease ever since, I did not listen to the numbers, because I am not a number. I am a person and a name.

      Oh, there were also thousands of prayers and anointing with oil. Cannot discount that.

      about 1 month ago
    • goyler's Avatar
      goyler

      I thought the same thing for a while myself but my doctor kept telling me, "somebody has to get better, why not you?" I love my doctor. I am in remission from stage IV, grade IV Kidney cancer for the past three years. I was diagnosed in 2013 and have beat the odds. Yes, the odds are stacked against you but "why not you?" Everyone is different.

      about 1 month ago
    • Ydnar2xer's Avatar
      Ydnar2xer

      I've been told my attitude was good during both times I had cancer treatment and I am glad about that. I figured a positive attitude for ME would help, plus the fact that NOBODY would want to be around me if I were all "gloom and doom". So I chose to be POSITIVE. It seems to have worked, so far---I am 16 years from first b/c diagnosis, 7 from the second. Am hoping now to avoid b/c number 3 since I only had TWO breasts to begin with! (Silly, I know, but it works!)

      about 1 month ago
  • OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy started following

  • OldGuy's Avatar

    OldGuy asked a questionGallbladder Cancer

    Do you have a friend or relative that has been diagnosed with cancer that won't take your advice?

    • Dawsonsmom's Avatar
      Dawsonsmom

      This is a tough one, no doubt! Unfortunately many of us were raised to “respect authority” and to not challenge. When it is hard wired, getting unwired takes a lot of courage and a lot of hard work. You didn’t say what kind of cancer or stage, grade, Mets, etc, so I’m wondering if your friend has something w a poor prognosis (like pancreatic cancer) and feels like it is futile or doesn’t have the energy to fight. Probably the most important thing you can do is to be supportive of their choices. It sounds like you have tried to convince them to take other actions so they know where you stand. Now, they need you to be supportive without risking sounding judgmental or like you are nagging. You could risk them isolating from you, which would be worse for both of you. Remember: the road to XXX is paved with good intentions.

      2 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I have been where you are now in trying to convince someone that something just didn't seem right. Our experience with going through lots of these things does give us a little advantage in knowing what to expect, how things "normally" go and when we should ask a few questions. If you have tried and are meeting resistance you will have to decide when you have to say you've done all you can do, what will be, will be.

      2 months ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      YES! My sister was diagnosed last year with stage IV pancreatic cancer and she's driving me crazy. She isn't doing the basics to take care of herself, won't ask for pain meds, basically does everything wrong. She did finally get a second opinion but that was only because she wanted a doctor to tell her what she wanted to hear - didn't happen.

      Anyway, long story short, I told her when she was first diagnosed that this is HER JOURNEY and she gets to do it or not, any way she pleases. No one else can walk the walk for her. We can suggest, we can pray, we can cajole, but in the end, it's her life, her journey, her cancer.

      I hope she's happy with the choices she's making and the life she's leading. I love her dearly and wish her the best. Some of her choices are driving me crazy but I have my own journey with cancer and I choose to do it differently. Again, it's all about individual choice.

      2 months ago