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    PattyMarie asked a questionEndometrial (Uterine) Cancer

    Have any of you used or had a "Henna Crown" put on when you lost your hair?

    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      There was a few people talking about those on the site a month or two ago, I don't remember who they were. They are a neat looking option for those who've lost their hair.

      2 months ago
    • lh25's Avatar
      lh25

      I think it's beautiful, but not my style.

      2 months ago
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    PattyMarie shared a photo

    Wall_henna_crown

    Have any of you used a Henna Crown when you lost your hair? I think this is a neat idea and I may try it. Anyone?

    3 Comments
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    PattyMarie asked a questionEndometrial (Uterine) Cancer

    Since my diagnosis I have been reading that I shouldn't be eating candy, and other sweet stuff.

    15 answers
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Happy Halloween!

      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fludeoxyglucose_(18F)

      Apparently the PET scan uses a specially developed, glow in the dark, radioactive type of sugar.

      Nobody is drawing any conclusions as to what it might mean but cancer cells seem to have more rceptors, thus more drawing power, than healthy cells for, at least, this type of sugar.

      Cackle, cackle, cackle

      4 months ago
    • MsMope's Avatar
      MsMope

      You got some really great answers to your question. I had endometrial cancer (UPSC) and carbo/taxol chemo et al. My last chemo was May 2014. Nowadays, I like to add the disclaimer that we all have different cancers, different treatments and different experiences. I speak from my experience.

      I'm not explaining this in scientific detail, but it's true just the same. Cancer cells grow rapidly. That's just the way they're built. Therefore, chemo is designed to kill rapidly-growing cells like cancer. Chemo then also affects other rapidly-growing cells, for example, the cells lining our digestive tracts from mouth to butt. That's why (generally) chemo causes lots of side effects along the GI system.

      Based on that, some people came up with a wonky cause and effect theory that cancer cells suck up sugar. In fact, all cells in the body suck up sugar (carbohydrates). That's good and normal. Cancer cells, because they grow rapidly/have a faster metabolism and, therefore, use a lot of sugar. They're like people who run marathons - they need more "fuel" to run than a sedentary person needs to watch television.

      My aunt really ticked me off by advising I should eat fresh fruit rather than canned fruit because cancer "grew" when I ate canned fruit. I ate canned fruit because it was palatable during chemo's rough patches. I stopped taking her phone calls.

      Anyway, consider nutrition guidelines any person should follow - all things in moderation. BUT OTHERWISE EAT ANYTHING YOU WANT! You're alive! Enjoy it! -MM

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Thanks, MsMope. Good explanation.

      4 months ago
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