• PattyMarie's Avatar

    PattyMarie asked a questionEndometrial (Uterine) Cancer

    Have any of you taken Trazodone for insomnia?

    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I have been taking this on and off for about three years. What Traz does is shuts off your brain so you can sleep. I never had any difficulty with this med at all. I very seldom remember what I dream but it's fine. It's amazing. No side effects at all. And I feel great in the morning.

      about 1 month ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      My research hematologist prescribed it for insomnia. He described it as a "clean drug" meaning that it is a fairly simple molecule (researchers!), has few side effects and may be stopped and started without the usual worries. Very low likelihood for abuse or addiction. It works very well in this capacity and 'may' also improve any anxiety or depression issues - especially those which we might not have noticed. It has been around for a long time and is available generic, i.e. affordable. One of the nurses at the cancer facility told me that she uses it to help her sleep.

      One caveat: start with a low dose. I was given 50mg tablets, but they made me lurch around like a drunk - and I weigh 200 pounds. I split them to 25mg, taken just before bedtime and they work well. The drug seems to be metabolized very rapidly, so going to bed immediately after taking them is the plan.

      Hope they work well for you!

      about 1 month ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      They worked well for me and I was able to quit them immediately. I started with a very low dose and that was all I needed.

      21 days ago
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    PattyMarie asked a questionEndometrial (Uterine) Cancer

    Just a "what if" question here. So "what if" my treatment doesn't work? How does a clinical trial work?

    4 answers
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      @PattyMarie,
      Hello, I'm an oncology nurse as nd I used to be a clinical coordinator for clinical trials. In oncology, a drug is rarely tried against a placebo. It is usually trialed against or with the standard of care therapy... For example, an immunotherapy against a chemotherapy or added to a chemotherapy. If you choose a trial, always try to get a phase 2 or 3, preferably a 3. You can go to a website called Centerwatch and research the trials available for your type of cancer and look for the inclusion/exclusion criteria to see if you qualify. The only time they use a placebo is if they are comparing a therapy or a device that is a new supporting therapy with nothing to compare it to but is not considered a therapy that could cure or kill, for example... A new therapy that increases your appetite as apposed to a placebo. Not a drug that fights cancer. Good luck to you and I hope this helps.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      When it is a life or death matter, no one just gets a placebo. You might get conventional treatment rather than the new drug. That was how it was going to work for me when I was in my trial. I would either get the trial drug or docetaxel. I was going to agree to participate if I got the new drug and wait for another trial if I was going to be on docetaxel (mine wasn't a blind study, obviously).

      You can withdraw from a trial at any moment for any reason. You will be monitored like a hawk, or I was. I had very frequent scans, a researcher, doctor and PA that followed my every move, all kinds of blood tests... Standard of care, at least for me, is WAY less than what I got as a participant in the clinical trial.

      I loved being in the trial and would jump at the chance of participating in another one. Let us know what you decide!

      3 months ago
    • MarciaLynn's Avatar
      MarciaLynn

      Thank you, PattyMarie, for posting the question that has been going through my mind for several weeks! And, thanks also to Carm and LiveWithCancer for their informative responses. Until I read their answers, I couldn't fathom any cancer patient agreeing to a clinical trial if half the participants were receiving placebos ~ it just didn't make sense.

      I'm not at a point in my journey to consider a clinical trial, but if I reach that point, I would definitely check out the options. I completed R-DA-EPOCH in December 2017and so far it has worked wonderfully for me; a few possible side effects but well worth the trade off to be alive and relatively "healthy."

      10/9/18

      3 months ago
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    PattyMarie asked a questionEndometrial (Uterine) Cancer

    Have you ever heard the conspiracy theory that there is a cure for cancer already? But pharma/gov. won't let it out?

    7 answers
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      Another one of those "lies" that get perpetuated. Probably from someone trying to "sell" an all-natural cure online.

      The prices are crazy, but traditional medicine is the only credible cure or long-term remission for cancer.

      4 months ago
    • lh25's Avatar
      lh25

      Anytime I hear a blanket "There is a cure for cancer", I tend to tune it out. There is not one thing called cancer, there won't be one cure.

      4 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      If Big Pharma found a cure for cancer it would not cost $100 it would cost $1000's of dollars. One "conspiracy theory" I do believe is that Big Pharma does make an outrageous profit off of the the cures we do have available. Most cancers are curable if they are caught early enough. But we need to find affordable screening methods. Many cancers are preventable because they are caused by environlmental conditions. But cleaning up the environment will probably take several generations (my generation did nothing to clean up the environment and now seems bent on destroying what was done by the following generation. There will probably never be a cure for stage IV cancer.

      4 months ago
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