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    peggy113054 shared an experience

    Celebration (Other): So now, I celebrate my living, by trying to give back by being a team captain for the Relay for Life event in our city. We have a small team, but we work had to raise money for the ACS. I also put together care bags and distribute these to the patients undergoing chemo in the hospital where I work. I feel that I have to do something to help others, so this is what I do.

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    • gwenstacy's Avatar
      gwenstacy

      Dear Other-Peggy, I really am grateful to be able to read your experience, It has been a comfort to me in a great way. Thank you for sharing, and any updates would be greatly appreciated! You are a positive inspiration for me. Thank you!

      over 3 years ago
  • peggy113054's Avatar

    peggy113054 shared an experience

    Celebration (Birthday): I celebrate every year I have another birthday. I don't make a big deal about this, but inside I am jumping for joy. I love getting older! I will never be in remission since the cancer I have is in my blood. My chemo keeps me stable and my doctors don't like using the word remission although he does say that if any other doctor looked at my blood tests, they wouldn't know I was a cancer patient!

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    peggy113054 shared an experience

    Drug or Chemo Therapy (Chemotherapy): I am now doing oral chemo with pills that I take daily for 21 days a month and a steroid taken once a week. This is easy to do and has some side effects like fatigue, diarrhea, and being susceptible to infections. These are fun side effects being that I work full time. I will have to do this probably for the rest of my life or as long as these pills work or as long as the doctors say I am able to take them. They really don't know.

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    peggy113054 shared an experience

    Celebration (Finished treatment): I finished my transplant and celebrated the fact that I got through it as easily as I had and as quickly as I had. I went back to work and all was well. I had to get blood tests routinely to keep track of my proteins, but that was nothing.

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    peggy113054 shared an experience

    Procedure or Surgery (Implant chemotherapy port): After getting out of the hospital, the next step was to get ready for the transplant. I had a chemo port implanted and had to give myself injections to get my stem cells ready. This took a week of daily in and out of the hospital. Then into the hospital for approximately 6 weeks for the transplant itself. I got myself mentally prepared for this. I had to take another leave from work and finally went into the hospital after many tests to make sure I was in shape for the transplant. Thankfully, I was. I used my own stem cells and after a week and a half of more, stronger chemo, I was ready for my stem cells to be transplanted. Luckily, I did not have any fevers and was able to be released in 5 weeks. One week sooner than I was told! I went back to work as soon as I was able and my doctor told me I was his only patient that had recovered that quickly. That made me feel great.

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    peggy113054 shared an experience

    Side Effects (Blood sugar, high (diabetes)): High blood sugar was just one of many side effects of oral chemo. Hair loss, fatigue, and muscle fatigue were a few more. The high blood sugar eventually put me in the hospital where I had to undergo physical therapy to walk again. This was the point where I had to take a leave from my job.