• seesun87's Avatar

    seesun87 wrote on carm's wall

    Happy Sunday Carm: Did you see my last post about the non-small cell lung cancer. I would love to get any information that I can from you. Thanks

    1 Comment
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Seesun87,
      I sent you my email address and will be happy to answer any question you have, Carm.

      about 4 years ago
  • seesun87's Avatar

    seesun87 wrote on shineon6's wall

    I was just reading your post. What did they do for the cancer in the lymphnodes? What type of treatment did you receive and are you still in active treatment? I would appreciate any information you can share.

    1 Comment
    • shineon6's Avatar
      shineon6

      They were removed during the lobe removal. The small cell cancer had not been identified until pathology evaluated the nodules two weeks later. I went though the chemo and radiation of the area to insure that none remained. So far so good. I have not been treatment since March 2012. I was very lucky! Wishing you all the best...........

      about 4 years ago
  • seesun87's Avatar

    seesun87 asked a questionCancer of Unknown Primary

    Now they are saying Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    5 answers
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      I'm with the Gregs, no cancer is a an automatic death sentence. The whole ordeal is frightening as heck and turns our lives upside down. I have advanced kidney cancer which has been stable for 3 1/2 years and is being treated as a chronic illness right now. I was also diagnosed with Metastasized breast cancer in early May - I am receiving infusion treatment and the the breast lesion (I have 2 very very small Kidney lesions and one breast cancer lesion on my liver) has shrunk by more then 50%. So never say never.

      about 4 years ago
    • seesun87's Avatar
      seesun87

      Greg, thank you for your response. I guess I'm confused because the only symptom I have is swollen lymphnodes in the right side of my neck. My visit yesterday was for a second opinion. At first I was told possible non hodkins lymphoma, after a biopsy of the swollen lymphnode they said Cancer of unknown primary, poorly differentiated carcinoma.The biospy suggested gastrointestinal area most likely colon. The Cancer Center (Moffitt) is waiting on sample of tissue so that they can do their own pathology on it. They feel I should be being treated for lung not colon. I will start the new treatment on Monday. It will consist of treatment once a week with Carboplatin and Avastin. I'm just feeling very confused. I need to really sit down and talk in detail with my oncologist. I'm thinking what if they are wrong again. According to my PET scan in early December when this all started the only place that showed any cancer was the right lung. My blood count WBC has never gone above 11. Any information that anyone has will be appreciated.

      about 4 years ago
    • seesun87's Avatar
      seesun87

      Greg & Sue have either of you been to the point where you have not had to be receiving treatment? I really appreciate you both responding to my question.

      about 4 years ago
  • seesun87's Avatar

    seesun87 asked a questionCancer of Unknown Primary

    Cry Baby?

    15 answers
    • Modern's Avatar
      Modern

      Especially durring the first couple weeks I cried a lot there's a lot of emotion in these situations so it happens :) feel better

      about 4 years ago
    • karen1956's Avatar
      karen1956

      Don't know if crying is a side effect of chemo....but you're not a big crybaby!!! Cancer is a big reason to cry.....its emotional......it is a reason to get depressed....talk to your cancer center about a social worker/psychologist who you can talk to....Hugs...

      about 4 years ago
    • maralyn's Avatar
      maralyn

      someone told me once that crying "cleanses the soul",,, i haven't had chemo, but i can cry over just about anything,,, an increase in my depression meds and a counselor has helped greatly!!! i have experienced alot of different feelings and thoughts, some that i never ever had before,,, but it is what i do with those feelings that matters,,, so i try to just feel them, i try not to "overthink" things too much, i cry it out, then i really try and let it go!!! this is CANCER, it can be very scarey and overwhelming at times, my prayers to everyone as we keep putting one foot in front of the other, one day at a time!!!

      about 4 years ago
  • seesun87's Avatar

    seesun87 wrote on carm's wall

    Carm, Thank you so much for the information. I am looking at the path report and you are so correct. It says the majority of cells stain with cytokeratin 20. SALLE4 also stains diffusely and strongly. Occasional cluster stain with cytokeratin 7. It states that the colon is the most common primary site that shows this pattern. My oncologist explained that in this case all we have to go by is the path report. I have never experienced any symptoms of colon cancer. The only thing I had was swollen lymphnodes in the right side of my neck. The biopsy was done on one of them. I can only put my trust in God and the oncologist. I am on Avastin, Leucovorin, 5-FU and one other that makes me have a metal taste in my mouth. I have the treatments every two weeks, and come home with 5-FU in a pump for two days. I just completed my second round on Wednesday and had the pump taken off today. My blood work after the first treatment showed good response, according to the oncologist. I consider myself lucky, because I am not feeling any nausea. I just feel a bit tired. I don't have any other health issues. I know that this site has helped me so much. It helps to hear all the success stories. Again, I appreciate your experience and any information. God Bless.

    1 Comment
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Seesun87, you are most welcome. I think those classes in genetics paid off. Leukovrin is actually folinic acid given with 5 FU synergistically; they are mutually beneficial to each other. Avastin is a biologic, so the only chemo you are getting is 5 FU. Sometimes patients are asymptomatic of their disease because they catch it early enough, so there are no symptoms. Might I suggest you go on a website called chemotherapyadvisor.com, if I have not already recommended it. Here you can see the regimens for your disease, the dosing, and learn about the side effects and the advantages of your therapy. It is good for you to know the arsenal that is at your disposal, and it will make you more a part of the progress that awaits you. Best of luck, and do not hesitate to ask anything of me. My very best to you, Carm.

      about 4 years ago
  • seesun87's Avatar

    seesun87 asked a questionCancer of Unknown Primary

    Looking for any information on Cancer of Unknown Primary.

    7 answers
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Hello seesun87, I am an oncology/end of life nurse and a diagnosis of cancer of unknown primary can seem pretty confusing, but this disgnosis is more common than you know. If a pathologist is confident of a cancer but cannot differentiate a general category of these abnormal growths called neoplasms (i.e; carcinoma, lymphoma, melanoma, sarcoma, etc) then this tumor is designated as a poorly differentiated neoplasm which means that under microscopic examination, the cells look much like normal cells so you can barely tell the difference between these cells and normal cells. Normally, to try and establish the type of cell or the cells origin, they can use a couple of diagnostic tools. One is called Immunoperoxidase Tumor Staining which can help classify the cells. Sometimes Electron Microscopy is used; however it is costly and so not widely available. Also Genetic Analysis helps determine some cancers because chromosomal abnormalities have been well characterized in several hematopoietic (cells formed in blood) cancers like Non Hodgkins Lymphoma. If your oncologist feels that the origin is the colon based on a biopsy, it is possible that through staining that biopsy they found certain antigens or proteins. For example, in a normal staining to establish a primary, there are an assortment of cytokeratins; these are proteins found in the tissues. Some are neutral or basic, and some are more acidic. They number CK 1 through CK 20. To come to a conclusion that the probable origin could be the colon; the staining might reveal CK 7 (-) and CK 20 (+). CK 7 is usually expressed in the ductal epithelium (cells that cover the surface of an organ) of the genitourinary tract and it is considered a neutral or or basic cytokeratin. CK 20 is most common in the gastrointestinal tract and it is more acidic. When using Electron Microscopy; in the broad category of cancers of unknown primary site, there are 5 major light microscopic diagnoses: (i) poorly differntiated neoplasm, (ii) poorly differntiated carcinoma (with or without the features of adenocarcinoma), (iii) well-differentiated and moderately well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, (iv) squamous cell carcinoma and (v) neuroendocrine carcinoma. I understand how it can be confusing. Looking at tissues under a microscope, many have characteristics unlike any other and we know by looking at them where they stem from or the type they are. However, sometimes they look so similar to other cells, it is hard to determine where they originate. It makes it hard to establish but not hard to treat. With the advance of chemotherapies, using combination therapy and targeted therapies, there are so many weapons in the arsenal that can trigger a response to this diagnosis. I hope this helps, Carm.

      about 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      My friend's mother was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer, but a primary tumor was never found mammograms and exams never. found anything amiss either breast. cancer is a tricky devil and the more we learn about it. the more we realize how much we still don't understand about its cause or how it spreads.

      about 4 years ago
    • packerbacker's Avatar
      packerbacker

      I can totally relate. I had a CT scan of my chest for chest pain which revealed some enlarged lymph nodes. Biopsies were inconclusive. Another biopsy of the lung again did not reveal anything definitive. A few months later, I had left sided ear and jaw pain, which revealed tongue cancer. Follow-up showed a new lung lesion, findings too undifferentiated to determine primary cancer. After treatment, 6 more lesions showed up. Biopsy of a lymph node shows a sarcomoid variant of head and neck cancer. I still don't have a primary site but will be starting my third different set of chemo drugs next week. I am confused also, but they are leaning toward some form of head and neck cancer, I think. As the cancer gets further along and spreads to other sites, the cells look less like they did than where it first started. So, a primary site can be difficult. I hope this helps you see that you are not alone!! It's frustrating, but keep communicating with your doc. Best of luck to you!

      about 4 years ago