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    Sofi wrote on HeidiJo's wall

    Thanks for your answer about hot flashes. My oncologist doesn't acknowledge any of these long-term side effects, so I am glad that there are people like you out there willing to share! All the best, Sofi

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    Sofi asked a questionNon-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

    Sweating Post Chemo

    5 answers
    • dhtdiver's Avatar
      dhtdiver

      I finished my RCHOP and radiation in Dec 2012 and noticed that my feet were quite warm and also had some numbness. The numbness is a side effect of the chemo -- my oncologist told me that an over the counter Vit B complex with folic acid would help. Started taking one over a year ago....some relief. As to the warmness -- I don't cover my feet at night and wear sandals during the day (in Phoenix that can be done pretty much year round). Am in total remission now -- let's see, total remission for warrm feet -- a good trade.

      about 2 years ago
    • jhale17's Avatar
      jhale17 (Best Answer!)

      Cold-Heat Intolerance and Polio Feet

      I have post-polio syndrome (PPS) that requires protection from temperature changes as a result of having Bulbar Polio when I was nineteen. This is a concern when hospitalized and in post-op care. I requested my PCP to amend my medical record to state I have PPS that requires protection from temperature changes.

      For cold I have to dress as though it is twenty degrees cooler and in heat I go quickly into heat exhaustion. I dress in layers to be able to adjust. I use air conditioning, wet towels and fan to cool off and heating pad or heating blanket to warm up. My twenty chemo treatments have exacerbated this problem.

      Here is article entitled Cold Intolerance and “Polio Feet” as Post-Polio Sequelae, by Dr. Richard L. Bruno. I think it was written in the nineteen-eighties. These PPS side effects seem similar to what chemo drugs are doing to cancer survivors. It may help you understand what chemo/radiation may have done to your body’s thermostat and how to cope. Good luck on your journey.

      “The reason bulbar polio survivors have such trouble with cold is that the parts of the central nervous system that should control body temperature were damaged by the poliovirus. In the brain the hypothalamus (the ‘automatic computer’ that controls the inner bodily environment) was damaged by the poliovirus, including the body’s ‘thermostat’ and the brain area that tells your blood vessels to constrict. In the spinal cord, the nerves that carry the message from the brain that tells the capillaries in the skin to contract when it is cold were also killed by the poliovirus.

      Thus, polio survivors are unable to stop warm blood from flowing to the surface of the skin as the outside temperature drops. This allows loss of the heat from the blood near the surface of the skin and causes the limbs to cool. When the limbs cool, arteries carrying blood to the skin and veins that should carry blood out of the skin narrow passively as they get cold, trapping blue venous blood in the capillaries and causing the feet to look blue and become even colder. The cold skin chills the motor nerves, causing them to conduct more slowly and to be less efficient in making muscles contract. The cold also chills the tendons and ligaments (like putting rubber bands in a freezer) making movement of weak muscles more difficult. As polio survivors know, it takes hours under an electric blanket or a long, hot bath to warm cold legs and regain strength.

      However, when polio survivors take a hot bath, blood vessels do exactly the opposite of what they do in cold. Polio feet and legs become bright red as arteries and veins relax and blood rushes to the skin. Then, when polio survivors stand to get out of the tub, they can feel dizzy or even faint as blood pools in their legs and causes their blood pressure to drop. The pooling blood in their feet also explains why polio survivors’ feet swell, swelling that increases as they get older. And polio survivors’ easily losing body heat explains why they have an increase in symptoms, especially cold-induced muscle pain, as the seasons change.

      Polio survivors need to dress as if it were 20° F colder than the outside temperature. They need to dress in layers and wear heat retaining socks or undergarments made of polypropylene (marketed as Gortex or Thinsulate) that should be put on immediately after showering when skin is warm. Polio survivors need to remind doctors that EMGs or nerve conduction tests must be performed in a room that is at least 75° F to prevent false abnormal readings and that a heated blanket is necessary in recovery room after polio survivors have surgery.”

      I hope this information helps you adjust your daily routine as necessary to keep you comfortable.

      about 2 years ago
    • HeidiJo's Avatar
      HeidiJo

      Yes, I am 4 years post R-CHOP and still get terrible hot flashes (sorry :( ) Sometimes I still get night sweats, I wake up drenched and shivering.

      about 2 years ago