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    Temmett asked a questionNon-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

    Cold and Flu season

    9 answers
    • cam32505's Avatar
      cam32505

      I had chemo in 2011 and didn't have a cold all winter that year, which was highly unusualy. In 2012, I had thyroid cancer and was being treated. I had to go for rai, which is an entire week being scanned and treated. Then, I had a cold. I called to cancel (a whole week is hard to reschedule at the last minute). They said I could proceed as long as I didn't have a fever. So, I continued. But, I had to lay still for 20 minutes in the scanner (and couldn't take cough medicine). Needless to say, I wasn't real successful. I hope you can stay well, but the kids will really be bringing things home to you. I guess a trip to the restroom when they come home from school would be a good routine to start, even before a hug.

      over 7 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I had my chemo through cold/flu season. I had both a flu and pneumonia shot before I started chemo. I worked through treatment and had a large sign in my cubical telling people (nicely) to take a hike if they were sick because I was immuno-compromised. And LOTS of hand sanitizer. I was never a sanitizer person before treatment, and I don't use it now, but I felt like I almost bathed in the stuff while in treatment. Didn't manage to catch a cold until about 3 months after treatment ended.

      over 7 years ago
    • Judt1940's Avatar
      Judt1940

      I stayed away from shopping during busy hours, crowds in general. Family members kept distance from me, no hugging, etc. Took vitamin B6/12 and Vit D thru chemo. Didn't have even a cold.

      over 7 years ago
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    User: po18guy

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    Temmett posted an update

    Got PET and bone marrow results yesterday. Doc has put me at stage 4. I don't know what I feel. Still having sleep issues. I feel so lost. My brain is going 100 miles a minute my body is just so tired. Is this normal?

    2 Comments
    • DJS's Avatar
      DJS

      Yup -- that's normal. It's going to take a while for you to pick yourself up off the floor and pull yourself together. All of us have a different timeline. Antidepressants, tranquilizers, books, TV…whatever gets your mind off things will help you get through things minute to minute. Then you string those minutes like pearls and gradually you get through it. Once I started treatment the trepidation and fantasizing all stopped and I was able to move forward. I hope the same goes for you. In the meantime…just get through the next minute the best you can.

      almost 8 years ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      However, stage IV Lymphoma is not like stage IV in other cancers. It remains as treatable in stage IV as it was in stage I. Lymphoma is a blood-borne cancer - a liquid cancer. It goes where it will, since it flows in your bloodstream and lymphatic system (part of your circulatory system). If it is in an organ or bone marrow, it is still reachable by the chemo. If you have a B-Cell Lymphoma, much is known about them and treatments are normally quite effective. Even if you have one of the rare T-Cell Lymphomas, there is still much reason for hope.

      I began at stage IV, with 50+ tumors and cancer in my bone marrow. And, it was an unknown sub-type of the rare and aggressive T-Cell Lymphomas. But that was back in 2008! So, chin up, as you are in good company!

      Since you are in Washington, I can only recommend that you at least seek a second opinion from Fred Hutchinson/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Their expertise has saved my life two, possibly three times now.

      almost 8 years ago
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    Temmett shared an experience

    Procedure or Surgery (PET scan and bone marrow biopsy and aspiration. ): PET scan was a breeze. Bone marrow is kinda a pain. Literally. I had conscious sedation. They said I wouldn't remember the pain. Not so much pain as I remember a burning feeling and lots of pressure. Rest of the day of and so far the day after I am pretty sore. Go in next week for the results to help decide a plan of attack.

    1 Comment
    • Roborjdz's Avatar
      Roborjdz

      I had midazolam as a local anaesthesic for my 3 bone marrow biopsies. It was wonderful! No pain no side effects no memory. Each time i asked the nurse when the oncologist was going to do start the biopsy only to find that he had completed the job and that i had been asleep for the last half hour.

      over 7 years ago
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    Temmett shared an experience

    Oh No (Diagnosed): Biopsy results came in. I was so scared waiting for the results but when they came into the room and told me almost instantly that fear was replaced by anger. Was sent to see oncology.