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    whatnext54 wrote on cllinda's wall

    35 rounds of radiation. How often did you have to go?

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    whatnext54 asked a questionBreast Cancer

    What next

    13 answers
    • TerriL's Avatar
      TerriL

      I had 30 treatments. My tnbc was in two lymph nodes

      about 9 hours ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Radiation was a breeze for me. The worst that might happen feels similar to a sunburn (at the end temporary). You shouldn't be shy about asking your doctor questions. It's part of an oncologist's job to answer your questions. The doctor's opinion is most important, since he's the expert.

      Remember you want to do everything you can to keep your cancer from recurring. Best wishes.

      about 1 hour ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      P.S. If you explain to the oncologist that you don't feel well, he may be able to give you some time for a break or even some medicine to make you feel better. Be sure you are eating a balanced diet and even a supplement like High Protein Boost to give you energy.

      about 1 hour ago
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    Question: What next

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    whatnext54 asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Fatigue

    8 answers
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      Yay, and big congratulations. As everyone said- yes your energy should return after about two or three months. I increased activity slowly and took naps as needed. Your body has been through a lot and it takes awhile to recover.

      14 days ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      All my life I had been plagued with bouts of chronic pain and fatigue but when I had Chemo the fatigue stayed with me for at least a year after chemo. I found that the diet I adopted after my feeding tube was removed helped. Some pointers are 1. Avoid Cafeine and Sugar, these are temporary stimulants and result in crashes. If you must have a cup of coffee limit it to one cup of black coffee. A good substitute for coffee is green tea. Avoid processed foods. Fresh in season produce is best.
      My cancer treatment included appointments with a dietitian who was very helpful. You would benefit from an appointment with a dietitian if your Dr. could refer you to one. My Medicare supplemental insurance paid for the appointments

      14 days ago
    • fiddler's Avatar
      fiddler

      Hi Fatigue... Energy comes back - gradually over time (3 years) - then plateaus to a new-you-level. I don't have the same energy all the time as I did B4 chemo, but there are times when I do. Much of my energy returned when I walked 3 miles a day and recently when I went on the KETO diet. Before KETO I was vegan and felt lousy and tired all the time. So maybe diet can help - along with exercise (as LiveWithCancer said). Give it time - we're such a instant-gratification society!

      12 days ago
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    Question: Fatigue

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    whatnext54 asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Port problem

    7 answers
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      Ports can move and sometimes flip. Talk to your doctor and /or the nurses at the chemo center. I was told that big breasted women have a higher probability of port displacement. I have had my port for five years, it is slightly tipped but still functions well. If in fact the port has moved, this may or may not present a problem to its functionality. When a port stops working or it’s placement is no longer ideal, it can be removed and another port can be placed on the opposite side . I have been told by many survivors that chest port removal is quick and painless. I can tell you that I had my abdominal port removed after chemo IP treatments right in the doctor’s exam room and that it was both quick and painless. Please get back to us and let us know what the doctor says about your port. Wishing you better days ahead.

      about 1 month ago
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013

      Lynne-I-Am...your pals must have been asleep or sedated when their ports were removed. I was wide awake and if there's a 'next time' and that's possible, I want sedation. My current port moves and sometimes the nurses can't access it at all and we struggle to search for a vein in the right arm. I've had my port clog up many times now and needed that sludge buster pushed through it but, I have no choice in having a port as there are no veins in either arm. Can't complain too much because I'm still above ground.

      28 days ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      Neither one of mine has moved, but this one seems to be more raised (sticks up). It's not uncomfortable, but you can see it under a t-shirt. The power port does become more clogged than the one 13 years ago. Moving it is not an option. I have a pacemaker on the other shoulder. Yes, I'm wired. A little humor. Neither one bothers me when I sleep so I'm good.

      2 days ago