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    WhatNextEmails asked a questionCancer

    Depression - How do you recognize it? Have you had it? What did you do about it?

    8 answers
    • Bugs' Avatar
      Bugs

      I haven't been diagnosed with depression, but I know I have had it. I have just almost stopped living at one point by just laying around, no interest in eating or talking to anyone, mad at the world, but I would say it's to be expected.

      about 1 month ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I've never talked to anyone about it but I am pretty sure that I had a touch of this during my last diagnosis and treatments. Mainly before treatments started and before I met with my oncologist for the first time. After I met with him and seen his positive attitude towards my case, that all changed and I felt better about my chances then.

      about 1 month ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      I wonder how many people are depressed and really do not realize or recognize it. I certainly did not realize I was depressed. After being diagnosed, I cried, A LOT. I thought, well this was perfectly normal since I had been essentially told by the gp who diagnosed me I had roughy two years to live. I could not discuss my diagnosis without crying. I went through the day to day motions, and was able to function ok, I thought, as long as I did not discuss anything medical. It was my new gp who told me he thought I was depressed. I thought, no, not me. I mean no one is happy after being diagnosed with cancer. Again, I started to cry in his office. Relunctantly I took a mild antidepressant he ordered for me. I could not believe the difference this medication made I became emotionally stronger and the tears dried up relaced by a determination to do whatever it took to beat this disease. I continued to take the medication throughout my treatment.

      about 1 month ago
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    WhatNextEmails asked a questionCancer

    Here are a few questions that were emailed to us, can any of you chime in on these?

    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      There is a genetic correlation between breast cancer and pancreatic cancer. Those who are braca positive run the risk of both.

      3 months ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      There is no correlation between gallbladder removal and pancreatic cancer and pancreatic cancer is only familial if members of the family are braca positive and have a history of brr breast or pancreatic cancer.

      3 months ago
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    WhatNextEmails asked a questionCancer

    Newlasta Onpro patch Vs. the shot *Emailed question*

    6 answers
    • lo15's Avatar
      lo15

      I give my husband the shot. HIs doctor said he is not a candidate for the patch nuelasta. We actually are discontinuing it this week because they have removed the oxiplatin from his chemo and they think we wont need the nuelasta any longer, The shot is easy to give , even to yourself if you have to.

      4 months ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      If you go back for shot, you only get charged for the shot - not another visit so Bonecrusher, don't worry about that.

      Skyemberr, I was on FOLFOX when Neulasta OnPro was introduced. My first bout of neutropenia, I had to make an hour trip to and from my cancer treatment center to get the shot. The next time, I developed neutropenia, the OnPro had been introduced and I wore it home with no problems. I got neutropenic one more time and got the Onpro again no problems.

      It doesn't interfere with FOLFOX because I have been NED for three years. So rest easy everyone - the Neulasta Onpro is a Godsend.

      4 months ago
    • MarciaLynn's Avatar
      MarciaLynn

      Neither the shot nor the patch were really a big deal for me, just another thing on my growing list I had to deal with on my journey! I had to give myself the shot after my first round of chemo and it wasn't hard to do. The last 5 treatments were via the patch, again no big deal. I had all 6 sessions of chemo as an inpatient for 5 days, so an appointment was set in a clinic at the hospital immediately following my discharge. I stopped on my way out and had the patch "installed." Again, not a big deal.

      BUT, the side effect of deep bone pain was horrible!! (first round only) It started about 4-5 days after injection and lasted a few days. I mentioned it to the doctor the next visit, and he told me to take Claratin the next time I had Neulasta. I did and had none of the bone pain from the last 5 treatments. 8/26/18

      4 months ago