• WhatNextEmails' Avatar

    WhatNextEmails shared a photo

    Wall_newsletter-icon-17

    February Newsletter is Out

    You should receive the newsletter in your email inbox that you used to register on the site, but some of you may not get it due to the email problem our system had over the weekend. You can click this link https://conta.cc/2DVy6PA to get it.

    1 Comment
    • beachbum5817's Avatar
      beachbum5817

      I have been getting everything on schedule for a couple of days now. Thanks, Greg.

      about 1 month ago
  • WhatNextEmails' Avatar
  • WhatNextEmails' Avatar

    WhatNextEmails asked a questionCancer

    A "what should I do" type of question that wishes to be anonymous.

    10 answers
    • JMP's Avatar
      JMP

      I w

      about 1 month ago
    • JMP's Avatar
      JMP

      I cared for my wife through out her fight with cancer. There is a helplessness in that you can not make your loved one better with a majic wand that will simultaneously cure your spouse and put everything back to the way it was before cancer.
      It is true that caregivers do most of their crying, yelling, cursing and complaining in the car. I mean how can you say “I’m not feeling that great today” to someone going through treatment without feeling ashamed of yourself.
      I’ll admit that I would have an occasional temper tantrum, I remember throwing all the Tupperware out of a cabinet when I couldn’t find the right lid. This is not normal for me, when people describe me, patience is usually top on the list.
      One thing that my wife did for me was to thank me from time to time. Although it was unnecessary it would always lift my spirit It was like a boost of fuel that kept me going. It reminded me that everything she and I were doing was for a purpose.
      I hope that your wife’s outburst was just a momentary loss of composure There is a good chance afterward she felt about as small as a human can feel, yelling at someone who is fighting cancer will do that to you.
      But that being said, having the occasional argument will for a brief moment trick you into thinking things are back to normal.
      I don’t write all of this to be an excuse for what your wife said. But there will be days (hopefully not too many) that you will need to be patient with her, and realize that what she may be saying is not necessarily directed at you but the situation you are both facing.

      about 1 month ago
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013

      What prior crisis have you faced as a couple? Did you work through it together, was there mutual effort? I recently had a lady tell me she was divorcing her husband (he worshipped her) because he has pancreatic cancer and can not work, so she wants out before suffering any major financial losses. She makes excellent money but, was never big on ‘sharing’.
      Those we trust to be our nearest and dearest can turn against us when faced with an inconvenience, like cancer, such abandonment is a common occurrence. Cancer is rough so find a support group where at least you have a place to go to take a break.
      I wish you well.

      about 1 month ago
  • WhatNextEmails' Avatar

    WhatNextEmails asked a questionCancer

    Depression - How do you recognize it? Have you had it? What did you do about it?

    8 answers
    • Bugs' Avatar
      Bugs

      I haven't been diagnosed with depression, but I know I have had it. I have just almost stopped living at one point by just laying around, no interest in eating or talking to anyone, mad at the world, but I would say it's to be expected.

      4 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I've never talked to anyone about it but I am pretty sure that I had a touch of this during my last diagnosis and treatments. Mainly before treatments started and before I met with my oncologist for the first time. After I met with him and seen his positive attitude towards my case, that all changed and I felt better about my chances then.

      4 months ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      I wonder how many people are depressed and really do not realize or recognize it. I certainly did not realize I was depressed. After being diagnosed, I cried, A LOT. I thought, well this was perfectly normal since I had been essentially told by the gp who diagnosed me I had roughy two years to live. I could not discuss my diagnosis without crying. I went through the day to day motions, and was able to function ok, I thought, as long as I did not discuss anything medical. It was my new gp who told me he thought I was depressed. I thought, no, not me. I mean no one is happy after being diagnosed with cancer. Again, I started to cry in his office. Relunctantly I took a mild antidepressant he ordered for me. I could not believe the difference this medication made I became emotionally stronger and the tears dried up relaced by a determination to do whatever it took to beat this disease. I continued to take the medication throughout my treatment.

      4 months ago
  • WhatNextEmails' Avatar
  • WhatNextEmails' Avatar

    WhatNextEmails asked a questionCancer

    Here are a few questions that were emailed to us, can any of you chime in on these?

    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      There is a genetic correlation between breast cancer and pancreatic cancer. Those who are braca positive run the risk of both.

      6 months ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      There is no correlation between gallbladder removal and pancreatic cancer and pancreatic cancer is only familial if members of the family are braca positive and have a history of brr breast or pancreatic cancer.

      6 months ago