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    woodcrafter asked a questionBrain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    LADIES!!! This is a general Question?

    14 answers
    • Zacksdad's Avatar
      Zacksdad

      Water and trail mix can be good. remember in most cases the monitor and chemo IV can be rolled with the patient if needed to go to the restroom. If offered take take the warm blanket. Try to take a nap. I take my Kindle which has 700 books on it and my MP3 which the nurses are familiar with so if I fall asleep they let me be.I always take strange hats to make people laugh I blame it on my brain tumor or Chemo Brain. I like laughing at my tumor I even gave it a name.

      about 3 years ago
    • MizJill's Avatar
      MizJill

      I've been thinking about this overnight and asking myself, what would be most appreciated by my husband and me, in our situation... so, here's what I've been thinking, and I believe others have mentioned similar thoughts above. Mainly, there's no one-size-fits-all answers, so don't *think* you know what they need on any given day; *ask* what you can do to help. Some of my friends have dreamed up various scenarios, already formed in their minds, about what they can do to give me (caregiver) a break, or my husband (patient) a diversion. Problem is, I can't just go to the spa for a day, nor can he go for a round of miniature golf. So, don't waste time guessing, because the situation changes from day to day. If someone asked me today, what would I say? I'd say, bring a book and come and sit for the afternoon, so I can get my hair cut without worrying that he's fallen and is lying on the floor. Change a lightbulb for me. Think about what you are good at and try to apply that skill to your loved one's life. Are you a gardener? Could their flower beds use a 'winterizing'? Are you a tech-head? See if they need help loading contacts into their smart phone, or help them download some books from the library to their tablet or e-reader. Think about it, have some possibilities in mind to gently suggest, and then go and *ask*, *listen* and *follow through*! xx Jill

      about 3 years ago
    • sherryhalpert's Avatar
      sherryhalpert

      My husband got a great gift basket from his office which included a deck of cards, some of those game books like crossword puzzles and suduko, green tea, whole grain crackers, a fleece throw, a recipe book for cancer, a book to read by a cancer survivor, a nice note pad with a pen, and a book about 100 ways too play solitaire. I am sure that these ideas will help your wife create her own that are specific to her friend. What a nice gesture.

      about 3 years ago
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    woodcrafter shared an experience

    Radiation

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    Question: Numbness

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    woodcrafter asked a questionBrain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    Numbness

    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Numbness,
      Hello, I am an oncology nurse and I think I can give you some insight until someone with a similar experience responds. I can tell you that a lot has to do with the location of the tumor and that not only surgery, but radiotherapy can also cause neurological deficits. It sounds like your surgery must have been done to the left side of your head if the problems you are experiencing are to the right side. So I don't know if your meningioma was in the location of the parasaggital region, the falcine, or possibly the sphenoid ridge. Another thing to consider is whether this arose from a genetic disorder called neurofibromatosis type 2, which will affect the nervous system, and also what nerves might have been involved with your tumor. I can see from your post that you are having some dexterity problems, and it sounds from your description that they are transient and not permanent deficits. One other thing to consider is that sometimes the culprit is scar tissue. It is interesting to note that with treatment of brain tumors, malignant or benign, the number one cause for seizures is the scar tissue. I can imagine that for you this must be very frustrating at times but the great thing about the brain is that although the cells do not regenerate, they do learn to adapt and find a way improve functionality. I have to commend you on attempting a post even at the point where an episode has just subsided; that shows great determination and resolve and I think after awhile, you will find a way to overcome any issue you are facing at this moment. Sometimes the best medicine is a dose of patience, but I can also say with confidence that what you are experiencing is not that uncommon with meningiomas. Best of luck to you and I hope someone answers your post soon. You might also try asking that question on the American Brain Tumor Association website and I have attached a link there. Be patient, I think you are articulating your thoughts very well. Like life...we just get better with time. Great job, Carm Rn.

      http://www.abta.org/

      over 3 years ago
    • Cindy's Avatar
      Cindy

      Numbness on one side of the body could be a sign of a stroke. My husband has had 2 of them. See the following website for symptoms: http://www.stroke.org/site/PageServer?pagename=SYMP . If you have any of these symptoms you should call 911 immediately.

      over 3 years ago
    • kamoore's Avatar
      kamoore

      Following my second surgery I was having episodes of numbness in the L side of my face and L arm and hand. My Dr wanted to increased my seizure meds which initially didn't help but then he changed me from Keppra to Dilantin and I have not had another episode. I didn't want to believe it was a form of seizure activity because it left me unable to drive for another 6 months but the fact that it stopped as soon as I was on Dilantin mad me realize it probably was a form of seizure. Mine lasted about 5 minutes each and I had 5 episodes in 4 days before changing meds then none since. I would discuss it with your neuro surgeon or neurologist. Good luck.

      over 3 years ago