• zaynah's Avatar

    zaynah asked a questionBreast Cancer

    Side effects from chemo

    5 answers
    • CarolLHRN's Avatar
      CarolLHRN

      You will make it! Somehow we all get through it. Take good care of yourself now. Embrace the nap. Most importantly, it's OK not to feel good now. You are going through a lot. I had to do 8 rounds of chemo. After the third one was the worst for me as far as wondering if I would get through. It seemed so far away but after I went the next time, I was half way done. Then, even though I was getting sicker with increased side effects, knowing I was getting closer and closer to being done made me feel better.

      I am 3.5 months out from chemo and I feel fantastic. I would say it took a good month before I started to feel a little better and then I would feel better and better every day after that. I still have hot flashes and numbness in my feet and hands but my oncologist told me to give it a good 6-8 months before all the side effects are gone.

      We are all cheering you on. You will get through this!

      over 4 years ago
    • SandiD's Avatar
      SandiD

      You will find you are stronger than you ever knew you could be! But going through it sucks. This is the time to baby yourself. The fatigue & runny eyes really bothered me. So rest & put a cold compress on your eyes. Turn a fan on when you are hot and eat whatever agrees with you. I remember when just taking a bath was an all day ordeal & I had to nap after! Your body us using energy to generate new cells that are being killed off by the chemo. That includes those nasty cancer cells! After my chemo was completed, I felt a little better each day. I ate healthier and rested when I needed to. My legs felt really weak for a few weeks, but laying around causes that too. Be patient Honey & visualize your body fighting & healing. YOU WILL BE OK! Your body is busy with a huge fight! Rest & keep up the fluids. (Remember it is ok to cry when you want to, it is a stress release.) Good luck.

      over 4 years ago
    • jvbaseballmom2's Avatar
      jvbaseballmom2

      You will make it. You need to track your progress after each one. Right now you are 50% finished, then you'll be 60%, etc. While you're going through it, it seems like it will never end, but you will get through it. Be strong, and don't be afraid to ask for help from others.

      about 4 years ago
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    Side Effects (Other): the list above has lots listed that I have but can only pick one

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    zaynah shared an experience

    Drug or Chemo Therapy (Chemotherapy)

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    User: bcsucks2012

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    zaynah asked a questionBreast Cancer

    is it true that I will not be able to be around people when I start chemo? I am not a stay in the house person. I dont care if people stare

    9 answers
    • AbbysMom's Avatar
      AbbysMom

      I was just very careful - lots of hand washing. I even went to church (might of been crazy about that since there's hand shaking). I had a cold during chemo that didn't get any further than that. Within a week after completion of chemo I came down with pneumonia and was in the hospital for a couple of days. Once everything was under control, I was out of there. There's many more bugs there than anywhere else. Just be cautious and smart. Good luck!

      over 4 years ago
    • IKickedIt's Avatar
      IKickedIt

      I worked throughout my chemo and was teaching computers to children from ages 3 - 13! Talk about one of the germiest jobs!

      Like others have mentioned, be vigilant about washing your hands. I had the containers of wipes everywhere! I had them in my car and would wipe my hands after using the ATM, coming out of a store, after pushing a shopping cart, etc. We had bottles of Purell everywhere, too. My kids' friends who came into our house had to goop, my students coming into the computer lab had to goop.

      I was cautious, not neurotic. Fortunately, I never got sick. Every time you go for treatment, they will test your blood counts. If it is below the acceptable limit, you won't receive treatment and will most likely receive an immune booster. During that time, when your counts are low, avoid crowds and sick people. But during other times, be cautious and wash frequently. Don't stop living, however!

      Also, avoid contact with soil and animal waste. My numbers went down after I had been blueberry picking. My onco nurses told me no more farms, picking or gardening.

      over 4 years ago
    • car092360's Avatar
      car092360

      I was using public transportation during my entire chemo treatments. I don't have a car so that's how I get to work. This was during the winter and flu/cold season. I took hand sanitizer with me wherever I went and made sure I used it. I was lucky that my WBC's stayed at a good level. I never once got sick from flu/colds. I'm a hand washing fool anyway (from years working daycare) so I already had precautions in place. Like Leepenn says "Hand Hygiene!". Good luck!

      over 4 years ago